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was rising in all of that, and the civil rights movement and she exposed us to lot. but i was just a junkie. the time i was 9 years old, i was handing leaflets out for robert kennedy. when i was 10, i made a big decision and broke with the democratic party and went to work for john lindsay who was running for mayor of new york. i went down to the liberal party headquarters and was handing out leaflets on the street corner in new york'. some women thought this was really cute, this little boy and leaflets. and she asked me why. and i made the case and got in early start in my political career. she said this is for you and she hands this box of pastries. i took a back to the liberal headquarters and we opened it up and there were all of these doughnuts and a lot of $10 bills. one of my early lessons in politics -- the district leader grabbed the money and said you can keep the doughnuts. [laughter] >> you and the friend sold bumper stickers for robert kennedy. >> yes. >> and buttons and other things. >> for those of us who lived through it and remember, that was a time of great turmoil, but a
contributor and civil rights and law professor avery friedman. morning, avery. >> good morning, carol. >> i think the thing that stands out for most people is that this man was convicted of murder for killing his grandmother who was 92 years old. apparently he beat her to death and he was on parole. he only served 17 years. how is that possible? >> yeah, it seems impossible to happen. but if you study this, spengler was in his late 20s when he committed this murder. and one would expect that he would have spent the rest of his life in the new york penal system. the fact is, though, that he was paroled out and actually had an obligation to report to his parole officer until this happened. but the fact is that it struck me as virtually impossible for the parole department not to know that this guy was a problem. the fact that he committed this murder -- again, even though he was in his 20s, unless he was a model person in the penitentiary, it would seem pretty obvious that there was a problem with this guy and of course the worst happened here. and we will never know, although we do tend to t
're really going to do it. and sometimes it sort of takes in social movements, whether civil rights, anything historically it takes a certain amount of push at the beep ginning to get the momentum started and many years of struggling and then some other big event at the end to sort of push us over the top. and i think we may have seen that. i'm especially hopeful that gun owners and gun supporters who want to have guns can get together and say -- and the polls show this is true and say yes we want to have our guns but we also want to do sensible things too. we don't want to see our children dying. let's quit fighting about whether to have this and sit down at the table and come up with thing that is any sensible person can agree to and let's do those things. host: one more call. this one from mark in florida on our line for republicans. caller: i would just like to thank you for your rational discussion on the subject. i agree, and i pray that we've reached a tipping point like last friday i cried like you and i don't pretend to be an expert on any of this i'm just a concerned citizen. and i
had the concealed guns, but if it was open, you were seeing what was coming. >> guest: right, when you came up on someone. vermont has no rules at all about that, but anyway, the -- >> host: the slave issue. >> guest: slaves also before the civil war, didn't have guns, and whites in the south, some of them began to see personal firearms as a means of defending themselves against slave rebelling, if they needed to. later on approaching the civil war, abolition a strong movement, abolitionists wanted to provide guns to no slavery and vice versa so they wanted to go to kansas to defend themselves against tax by their opponents. the ku klux klan and groups like that arose persecuting freed blacks in the south, and the blacks began to look for ways to defend themselves. the federal government tried to institute new state militias in the southern states, and blacks saw them as a way of self-defense. >> host: guns played a role in history. what was the legal understanding. when there were restrictions, did they consider that unconstitutional or one they thought as an urban area or city on the
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4